Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

Facial width-to-height ratio predicts fighting success: A direct replication and extension of Zilioli et al. (2014)

Published onMar 09, 2022
Facial width-to-height ratio predicts fighting success: A direct replication and extension of Zilioli et al. (2014)
key-enterThis Pub is a Version of
Facial width‐to‐height ratio predicts fighting success: A direct replication and extension of Zilioli et al. (2014)
Description

Zilioli et al. (2014) were the first to show an association between male facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) and physical aggression and fighting ability in professional mixed-martial-arts fighters. Here, we re-examined this relationship by replicating (using all original measures) and extending (using 23 new variables related to fighting performance) Zilioli et al. (2014) in a statistically well-powered sample of 520 fighters using automatic and manual measures of the fWHR involving both eyelid and eyebrow landmarks, used interchangeably in previous reports (Studies 1–2). Most importantly, we successfully replicated Zilioli et al.'s (2014) central finding that fighters' fWHR, when manually calculated using the eyebrow landmark, predicted their fighting success (p = .004, controlling for body mass index and total fights). Consistent with past criticisms of using fight rather than fighter data to examine fighting success, which have argued that individual fights can be suddenly and unexpectedly determined and do not capture an individual's overall ability to succeed, Study 3 (N = 1367 fights) found no association between fWHR and singular victories. Studies 1–3 showed continual evidence that larger fWHRs were associated with grappling abilities, even after controlling for demographic and allometric factors. Strikingly, Study 3 discovered associations between all fWHR measures and grappling skill that remained robust before and after controlling for 17 different control variables. We discuss that grappling, or the act of taking down an opponent, involves a more aggressive, close-combat approach than does striking. Combined, these results offer additional support for the argument that fWHR may have been shaped by sexual selection.

 

Comments
0
comment
No comments here
Why not start the discussion?