Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

Interrupting gender and intersectional microaggressions and active bystander training to counter gender-based violence to improve security and learning environments at The University of the Witwatersrand

Gender microaggressions are defined as brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities that communicate hostile, derogatory, negative, and sexist slights and insults toward women (Nadal 2010) and gender fluid individuals. Research has shown that ...

Published onMay 05, 2023
Interrupting gender and intersectional microaggressions and active bystander training to counter gender-based violence to improve security and learning environments at The University of the Witwatersrand
key-enterThis Pub is a Version of
Interrupting gender and intersectional microaggressions and active bystander training to counter gender-based violence to improve security and learning environments at the University of The Witwatersrand
Description

Gender microaggressions are defined as brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities that communicate hostile, derogatory, negative, and sexist slights and insults toward women (Nadal 2010) and gender fluid individuals. Research has shown that such microaggressions, sexism, and gender-focused incivility are related to higher rates of gender-based violence (GBV) (Gartner and Sterzing 2014). In fact, Gartner and Sterzing posit that “gender microaggressions exist as a unique form of youth sexual violence and function as a potential ‘gateway mechanism’ to legally actionable offenses”. In this study, I will work with colleagues at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) to administer a Gender and Intersectional Microaggressions (GIMA) survey. My recent study (Zerai 2021) shows that microaggressions are intersectional. This project will add to the vast microaggressions literature (Sue et al 2007; Lewis et al 2019) by demonstrating that “all women are not the same gender” (Brown 1995). I hypothesize GIMAs experienced by women are amplified among students who occupy a combination of marginalized intersecting social locations, i.e. who are Black (in South African context, this includes African, Chinese, Indians and Coloureds), persons with disabilities (PWD), who are LGBTQIA, and/or who come to Wits from rural areas of South Africa, who may be immigrants, or who traveled from other countries on the African continent, all of whom likely are underrepresented in higher education. Based on the research literature and GIMA survey results, we will work with colleagues at Wits to develop a toolkit for interrupting GIMAs. We will then lead active bystander workshops to support the Wits community’s work to interrupt GIMAs, GBV, and thus improve the learning environment for all students.

 

Comments
0
comment
No comments here
Why not start the discussion?