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Adverse Childhood Experiences and Intimate Partner Violence Among Youth in Cambodia: A Latent Class Analysis

Published onMay 02, 2022
Adverse Childhood Experiences and Intimate Partner Violence Among Youth in Cambodia: A Latent Class Analysis
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Adverse Childhood Experiences and Intimate Partner Violence Among Youth in Cambodia: A Latent Class Analysis
Description

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a global public health problem, including in low- and middle-income country settings, and are associated with increased risk of intimate partner violence (IPV) during young adulthood. However, current measurement of ACEs may underestimate sequelae of different combinations, or classes, of ACEs and mask class-specific associations with adult exposure to IPV. We used data among ever-partnered young women and men aged 18–24 years from the Cambodia Violence Against Children Survey ( Nw = 369; Nm = 298). Participants retrospectively reported on seven ACEs and lifetime physical and/or sexual IPV victimization and perpetration. Latent classes comprised of ACEs were used as predictors of physical and/or sexual IPV perpetration and victimization, controlling for household wealth. Identified latent classes for women were “Low ACEs” (60%), “Community Violence and Physical Abuse” (23%), and “Physical, Sexual and Emotional Abuse” (17%). Latent classes for men were “Low ACEs” (48%) and “Household and Community Violence” (52%). Among women, those in the Physical, Sexual and Emotional Abuse class were more likely to experience and perpetrate physical and/or sexual IPV in their romantic relationships compared to the reference group (Low ACEs). Women in the Community Violence and Physical Abuse class were more likely to perpetrate physical and/or sexual IPV, but not experience IPV, compared to women in the Low ACEs class. Among men, those in the Household and Community Violence class were more likely to perpetrate physical and/or sexual IPV against a partner, compared to men in the Low ACEs class. Overall, patterns of ACEs were differently associated with IPV outcomes among young women and men in Cambodia. National violence prevention efforts might consider how different combinations of childhood experiences shape risk of young adulthood IPV and tailor interventions accordingly to work with youth disproportionately affected by varied combinations of ACEs.

 

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