Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

ESCAPE ROUTES: AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL INTERVENTIONS

The problem of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the role of various organizations—including shelters, courts, law enforcement, and child protective services, among others—is a pervasive one affecting every demographic in society. The issue is compounded by structures of ...

Published onAug 08, 2023
ESCAPE ROUTES: AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL INTERVENTIONS
key-enterThis Pub is a Version of
ESCAPE ROUTES: AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL INTERVENTIONS
Description

The problem of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the role of various organizations—including shelters, courts, law enforcement, and child protective services, among others—is a pervasive one affecting every demographic in society. The issue is compounded by structures of inequality and stubbornly enduring assumptions about victims of domestic violence that are held by the broader society and, in turn, by those who inhabit positions within the institutions with which victims come into contact. This dissertation focuses on the experiences of actors working within agencies responding to intimate partner violence, how they perceive their role, interact with victims/survivors, and collaborate with partners in other agencies. The purpose of this research is to help understand underlying bias within institutions and highlight how responses might be hindered by cultural constructions of victimhood and violence, as well as the constraining structures of institutions. I explore these issues through interviews with actors working with the organizations that respond to intimate partner violence and survivors of IPV in a mid-sized southeastern city with a well-developed team of responders to domestic violence. I find that the collaborative model of coordinated community responses (CCRs) is a useful tool for communities responding to violence but requires improvement to better address response. I examine the restrictions placed on victims through cultural understandings of victimhood and violence and address how the criminal legal system can improve approaches to intimate partner violence. Finally, I discuss the implications for future research and ways that these themes can contribute to improvements in the way our institutions, and the people within them, respond to IPV.

 

Comments
1
?
Long Term Disability Lawyer: